Video shows humans were used to test vehicles in Germany

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Disturbing footage has re-emerged of real people being used as crash test dummies in 1970s Germany. 

The footage shows people being violently thrown around by cars in their seats during simulation car crashes.

It also shows people smashing into other cars with passengers inside, as well as hitting stationary objects such as trees. 

The clip aired on ABC’ television program ‘Ripleys Believe It Or Not’ in 1985 to highlight the importance of wearing a seat belt during a car crash. 

The video opens with people sitting in car seats with a seat belt strapped on, simulating the whiplash of a real car crash. 

Jack Palance, the narrator of the program, says: ‘No matter how well made, no crash dummy acts exactly like a human volunteer.’ 

‘That’s why these German tests were particularly valuable to scientists studying whiplash.’

Following the crash simulations, human volunteers are shown driving cars on roads and deliberately crashing them. 

One man is shown slowly driving onto a main road, deliberately colliding with another driver speeding down a road. 

Another driver is shown speeding straight behind a stationary vehicle, crashing into it. 

The video opens with people sitting in car seats with a seat belt strapped on, simulating the whiplash of a real car crash

The video opens with people sitting in car seats with a seat belt strapped on, simulating the whiplash of a real car crash

In all the instances shown on the program, none of the drivers appear to be harmed and one driver even appear to laugh after a crash at the end of the video. 

These types of tests have also been done using human cadavers. 

In 2013, cash-strapped Spanish researchers admitted using human bodies as crash test dummies.

The scientists said not only are they cheaper than finding £120,000 for a crash test dummy – they also yield better results.

In all the instances shown on the program, none of the drivers appear to be harmed and one driver even appear to laugh after a crash at the end of the video (pictured) 

In all the instances shown on the program, none of the drivers appear to be harmed and one driver even appear to laugh after a crash at the end of the video (pictured) 

In all the instances shown on the program, none of the drivers appear to be harmed and one driver even appear to laugh after a crash at the end of the video (pictured) 

The researchers at the Technology Park in Alcaniz in northern Spain admitted using cadavers in car-crash simulations and added they were one of six places in the world where human body crash test simulations were carried out.

In most cases they said bodies were made available for car safety tests after they had been finished with by medical universities.

However, the history of using human remains in crash testing spans at least half a century.

Before the 1950s, car makers assumed no-one could survive a serious crash.

WHY SPANISH RESEARCHERS USED HUMAN CADAVERS AS CRASH DUMMIES

In 2013, cash-strapped Spanish researchers admitted using human bodies as crash test dummies.

The scientists said not only are they cheaper than finding £120,000 for a crash test dummy – they also yield better results. 

The researchers at the Technology Park in Alcaniz in northern Spain admitted using cadavers in car-crash simulations and added they were one of six places in the world where human body crash test simulations were carried out.

In most cases they said bodies were made available for car safety tests after they had been finished with by medical universities.

But when Detroit’s Wayne State University decided to test how much a body could tolerate in a smash, researchers raided the medical school to find suitable subjects.

In one early study, embalmed corpses were flung down an elevator shaft. 

In 2008, Swedish newspaper Expressen reported that auto manufacturer Saab had used donated corpses in their crash tests. 

Rusty Haight was a human crash test dummy who took part in over 700 controlled collisions and is now director of the collision safety institute (CSI) in Texas.

The clip aired on ABC' television program 'Ripleys Believe It Or Not' in 1985 to highlight the importance of wearing one's seat belt during a car crash. During the clip, a man is showed driving a car straight into a tree trunk, smashing his car bonnet

The clip aired on ABC' television program 'Ripleys Believe It Or Not' in 1985 to highlight the importance of wearing one's seat belt during a car crash. During the clip, a man is showed driving a car straight into a tree trunk, smashing his car bonnet

The clip aired on ABC’ television program ‘Ripleys Believe It Or Not’ in 1985 to highlight the importance of wearing one’s seat belt during a car crash. During the clip, a man is showed driving a car straight into a tree trunk, smashing his car bonnet

Originally a policeman Mr Haights was teaching accident investigation and told New Scientist he needed some ‘hands on experience.’

Mr Haights said his fastest collision speed was 43 kilometres per hour and he regularly experienced forces of up to 10 G.

‘That’s 10 times the force of gravity – and that lasts for just over a 10th of a second,’ said Mr Haights.  

‘So, say I weigh 200 pounds, for a brief moment in time it feels as if I weigh 2000 pounds. 

‘That’s why you cannot really brace against a crash,’ he said.

These types of tests have also been done using human cadavers. In 2013, cash-strapped Spanish researchers admitted using human bodies as crash test dummies

These types of tests have also been done using human cadavers. In 2013, cash-strapped Spanish researchers admitted using human bodies as crash test dummies

These types of tests have also been done using human cadavers. In 2013, cash-strapped Spanish researchers admitted using human bodies as crash test dummies





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