Google Maps reveals UVB-76 The Buzzer radio broadcast location in Russia

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Bizarre transmissions, known as UVB-76 or The Buzzer, have been broadcasting for more than 40 years from somewhere inside the country.

And no one has ever explained exactly why.

A popular prevailing theory is that the buzzer works as a “death switch” which would launch an automatic nuclear strike if Russia was targeted.

Some have even suggested they are a secret channel with aliens.

Anyone in the world can tune in simply by turning their radio to the frequency 4625 kHz.

The strange buzzing, occasionally broken up by Russian words and numbers, was first recorded in 1982.

“There’s absolutely no information in the signal,” said David Stupples, an expert in signals intelligence from City University, London.

Many people suspect they were military communications during the Cold War, which was characterised by radio signals and cryptic codes.


DS


DEATH SWITCH: Google Maps has revealed locations of mystery radio buzzer in Russia
(Pic: DS)

However the frequencies of the transmission increased following the collapse of the Soviet Union.

On March 18, 2014, less than 24 hours after Crimea voted to join the Russian Federation, a voice read out: “T-E-R-R-A-K-O-T-A. Mikhail Dimitri Zhenya Boris [MDZhB, the callsign of the station]. Mikhail Dmitri Zhenya Boris. 81 26 T-E-R-R-A-K-O-T-A.”

Internet sleuths were fascinated when a woman’s voice appeared out of nowhere on February 12, 2014.

In what is believed to have been a mistake, she began by stating “hallo Vulcan”.

During their phone conversation, an operator said: “Ok, Masha, I’m standing by here for a while, and what was that channel number in Vulcan classification?”

GOOGLE


UVB-76: One of the Buzzer locations in Leningrad Oblast near St Petersburg
(Pic: GOOGLE)

Priyom.org


BUZZER: It is claimed this site in Leningrad Oblast is where UVB-76 is broadcast
(Pic: Priyom.org)

The Kremlin has never spoken out on the buzzing sounds but civilian investigators claimed they traced the transmission to a site near the town of Povarovo, close to Moscow.

The mystery deepened when in 2010 the buzzer’s broadcast appeared to move to Pskov near the border with Estonia.

Urban explorers claimed to have found the site in Pskov.

They spoke of a creepy abandoned military base which had a radio log that confirmed the operation of a transmitter at 4625 kHz.

In recent years The Buzzer now appears to broadcast from two completely different locations.

UVB-76 Naro FominskPriyom.org


LOCATED: This is believed to be one of the Buzzer sites in Naro Fominsk
(Pic: Priyom.org)

GOOGLE


THEORY: Internet sleuths claim the Buzzer has been traced to this 69th comms hub
(Pic: GOOGLE)

And according to a blog post, you can even view these two locations on Google Maps.

One, under the co-ordinates 60°18’40.1″N 30°16’40.5″E, is located in the district of Leningrad Oblast, around 30 miles from St Petersburg.

This site reported to be part of the 60th communication hub which serves the west military district.

A second broadcasting location has been identified on Google Maps as the 69th Communication Hub at Naro Fominsk.

Pictures online show radio towers and antennas at the complex, under the co-ordinates 55°25’35″N 36°42’33″E.

To this day the buzzer transmissions still continue but they did stop at one point eight years ago.

Radio monitor Ary Boender from Holland, who runs the website Numbers Oddities, told MailOnline: “Some say that it is an old Soviet Dead Man’s Switch that triggers a nuclear attack on the west when it stops buzzing.

“Others say that it is a homing beacon for UFOs, or a mind control device with which the Russians can program your mind.

‘When the buzzer stopped buzzing on September 1, 2010 many of the conspiracy fans thought that it was the end of the world.

“But no nuclear attack followed nor did the UFOs land.”



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